5 to Try: Flan in Miami

Sweet seekers with a knack for Latina American treats know that any respectable Cuban eatery has to make a mean flan. The rich yet wobbly treat -- a creamy blend of vanilla, egg, and caramel sauce -- typically receives top billing on the dessert menu. Here are the five places that deserve a dieting break to sample the ethnic meal ender. (Photo: Shutterstock/tacar)

Updated: October 21, 2009

Cuban Flan


Puerto Sagua Restaurant

700 Collins Ave, Miami Beach, FL 33139

South Beach is surprisingly lacking when it comes to Cuban restaurants. This longstanding venue both fits the bill and the billfold, with its modest prices. Three flan flavors are available. Egg, caramel and cheese custards fill out the menu.


La Carreta Restaurant

11740 SW 88TH St, Miami, FL 33186

Drivers are never too far away from one of the city's many La Carreta locations. There is even one tucked inside Miami International Airport for the procrastinating tourists who missed out on their flan fix. The chain's four varieties are original, cheese, coconut or caramel.


Versailles Restaurant

3555 SW Eighth St, Miami, FL 33135

At the city's iconic Cuban eatery, elderly waitresses relish serving up $3 portions of the signature treat. Guests with pocket change can kick things up an exotic notch. Coconut or guava can be added to the treat for just 50 cents more.


Havana Harry's

4612 S Le Jeune Rd, Coral Gables, FL 33146

The dessert menu at this higher-end eatery is so nimble that it pats its own back, bragging about a "best in Miami" accolade for its flan from The Miami Herald. In addition to the traditional egg-based version, diners can also choose from coconut or the caramel-topped dulce de leche varieties.


Casa Larios

7705 W Flagler St, Miami, FL 33144

Traditionalists will stick to either the milk-based flan or the prevalent cheese-based kissing cousin custard. However, this is also the same eatery that inspired Gloria and Emilio Estefan to team up with the family owners to launch the now national Bongo's chain. A little pizazz is in order, so the tropical sweet tooth can go with fruity varieties with either mamey or mango.